Profitability Ratios Calculator

Financial ratios are created by using data from your financial statements to gain information about your business. Analyse the data to assess your business’s profitability, liquidity, operating efficiency and leverage. This calculator is designed to show you 10 different financial ratios. Financial ratios are used as indicators that allow you to zero in on areas of your business that may need attention such as solvency, liquidity, operational efficiency and profitability. A regular review of your company’s financial ratios can help you focus on areas that may need improvement. Liquidity, efficiency, and profitability ratios, compared with other businesses in your industry, can highlight any strengths and weaknesses you might have over your competition.

  • This ratio is a measurement of a company\’s tax rate, which is calculated by comparing its income tax expense to its pretax income.
  • Liquidity ratios measure your business’s ability to turn assets into cash to repay debts or make purchases and investments.
  • How do you know if two ratios are equivalent or if one is larger than the other?
  • A large difference between Return on Assets and Return on Equity points to a significant amount of debt being utilized by the firm.
  • The interest coverage ratio, also called the times interest earned ratio, shows how easily your business can pay interest due on any outstanding debts during a given period.

Return on Equity provides the amount of net income returned as a percentage of shareholders equity. Return on equity measures a corporation’s profitability by revealing how much profit a company generates with the money shareholders have invested. The Quick Ratio is an indicator of a company’s short-term liquidity.

Calculations Used in this Calculator

Increased purchasing or reduction of accounts payable will increase this ratio. A high current ratio is indicative of a high liquidity position which lowers the chance of a cash crunch. A current ratio that is too high however indicates ineffective optimization of cash, too much inventory or large account receivables with poor collection policies.

  • A company’s assets can be divided into assets funded by equity, and assets funded by debt.
  • Use the Price to Book Ratio Calculator to calculate the price to book ratio from your financial statements.
  • A ratio that is lower than 1 indicates higher production costs per product than revenue earned per product.

Use the Price to Book Ratio Calculator to calculate the price to book ratio from your financial statements. Use the Price to Earnings Ratio Calculator above to calculate the price to earnings ratio from your financial statements. Use the Debt Servicing Ratio Calculator above to calculate the debt servicing ratio from your financial statements.

Use the Du Pont Analysis Calculator above to calculate the Du Pont Ratios from your financial statements. Price to Book Ratio tells us the relative value the market places on the company to the accounting valuation. This ratio provides a basic understanding of residual value of a company should it go bankrupt. Times Interest Earned is used to measure a company’s ability to meet its debt obligations.

Financial Statements Analysis

Use the Inventory Turnover Period in Days Calculator to calculate the inventory turnover period in days from your financial statements. Use the Gross Profit Margin (Gross Margin) Calculator above to calculate the gross profit margin (gross margin) from your financial statements. Return on Assets is an indicator of how profitable a company is relative to its total assets.

The Importance of Financial Ratios

The asset turnover ratio measures your business’s ability to generate sales from assets. The quick ratio, also known as an acid-test ratio, measures your business’s ability to pay off short-term liabilities with quick assets. Financial ratios analysis is the most common form of financial statements analysis. Financial ratios illustrate relationships between different aspects of a company’s operations and provide relative measures of the firm’s conditions and performance. Financial ratios may provide clues and symptoms of the financial condition and indications of potential problem areas. To use this financial ratio calculator correctly, you need to type row numbers from respective account names financial ratio worksheet.

Quick reference guide: financial ratios

This ratio is useful to help assess a business’s financial strength and its efficiency in using all available resources. A high ratio indicates the ability of the firm to generate revenue against its assets which can be realized by the shareholders. Return on Assets improves by increasing the efficiency of utilizing the technology, financing or management of inventory by the firm.

A treasury management partner with your business in mind.

The operating expense margin indicates how much of the sales dollar will be used for operating expenses, such as rent, gas and electricity. Brett’s Bakery has a cost of direct materials of $85,000 and sales of $145,000. The material to sales ratio indicates how much of your sales dollar is consumed by the cost of direct materials. You can use this ratio (expressed as a percentage) to measure how well you are containing your expenses. For example, you might set yourself a goal to achieve better than 18%. The risk appetite of the company’s management and the type of business it engages in will influence the outlook of this ratio.

The Return on Invested Capital measure gives a sense of how well a company is using its money to generate returns. Comparing a company’s return on capital (ROIC) with its cost of capital (WACC) reveals whether invested capital was used effectively. A free best practices guide for essential ratios in comprehensive financial analysis smart accounting practices for independent contractors and business decision-making. This ratio calculator will accept integers, decimals and scientific e notation with a limit of 15 characters. Then, compare the decimal values to determine if the ratios are equal or if one is larger than the other. Brett’s Bakery has a net profit of $45,000 and interest expenses of $10,000.

Use the Operating Margin Calculator to calculate the operating margin from your financial statements. Operating Margin shows the profitability of the ongoing operations of the company, before financing expenses and taxes. Gross Profit Margin (Gross Margin) is used to assess a firm’s financial health by revealing the proportion of money left over from revenues after accounting for the cost of goods sold. This ratio is a measurement of a company\’s tax rate, which is calculated by comparing its income tax expense to its pretax income.

The ratio is calculated by dividing a company\’s earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT) by the company\’s interest expenses for the same period. The lower the ratio, the more the company is burdened by debt expense. When a company\’s interest coverage ratio is only 1.5 or lower, its ability to meet interest expenses may be questionable. Manage your cash flow by trying to collect cash from your debtors before paying your creditors. Aim for your accounts receivable figure to be less than your creditors turnover figure.

Use the Inventory Turnover Calculator to calculate the inventory turnover from your financial statements. Use the Accounts Receivable Turnover Calculator to calculate the accounts receivable turnover from your financial statements. Use the Profit Margin Calculator above to calculate the profit margin from your financial statements. Use the Quick Ratio Calculator above to calculate the quick ratio from your financial statements.

The calculations provided should not be construed as financial, legal or tax advice. In addition, such information should not be relied upon as the only source of information. This information is supplied from sources we believe to be reliable but we cannot guarantee its accuracy. Hypothetical illustrations may provide historical or current performance information.

For example, a food business might have a stock turnover of less than 5 (perishables) or manufacturing might have a stock turnover of 40+. Talk to your accountant or financial adviser for advice on how to best use ratios in your business. Ratio targets may differ depending on your business situation and industry. Learn how to calculate ratios using our calculators and read examples to help you apply them to your business. It is based on information and assumptions provided by you regarding your goals, expectations and financial situation. The calculations do not infer that the company assumes any fiduciary duties.


Posted

in

by

Tags:

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *